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Update May 22Unfavorable winds and weather on the Atlantic route combined with airplane equipment problems forced the New York to Paris speed flight to be canceled. There was only a short window of time that the flight could have happened, and the window has now closed. Mr. Lloyd will fly back to Texas for repairs as soon as the storm clears in Long Island, New York.
Brian Lloyd is scheduled to take off from Miami on the Amelia Earhart 80th Anniversary round-the-world flight on June 1st.

A new press release will be uploaded soon.

Press Release: Download: TXT PDF

New York to Paris Flight CANCELED

Brian Lloyd Solo Flight Commemorates 90 Years Since Lindbergh

Aviator Attempts New York To Paris Solo Record

New York, USA, May 22, 2017 – As pilot Brian Lloyd propels his single-engine plane named “Spirit” into the sunrise this week from Republic Airport on Long Island, he embarks on a dual mission. He is commemorating Charles Lindbergh’s famous transatlantic flight that made history in May of 1927. Mr. Lloyd is simultaneously attempting to break a solo speed record for the New York to Paris air route.

“I am driven by the spirit of historic flights,” Brian Lloyd said, “it is important to remember the pioneers like Charles Lindbergh, and their contributions to aviation. Their bold actions made today’s air travel possible for all of us.”

Mr. Lloyd expresses the special significance of this transatlantic route, “My father taught me to fly when I was 14 years old. We flew to the 1985 Paris Air Show together in a single engine aircraft like this. Aviation is in my family; both of my sons are pilots.”

Commercial airliners fly long distances every day, but non-stop ocean flights are quite difficult for small propeller planes, which have limited range. To make it possible, Brian Lloyd modified his 1979 Mooney airplane to carry 150 gallons more fuel, then equipped it with modern navigation equipment and long range communications. Still, the flight is not without risk, and special safety gear must be taken along. The public is able to track his flight on the web, social media, and ham radio.

When Mr. Lloyd returns to USA from Paris, he won’t have much time before taking off on the next phase of Project Amelia Earhart, a round-the-world commemoration of Amelia Earhart’s historic flight, which departed 80 years ago in June of 1937 from Miami.

About: Brian Lloyd, 62, is a pilot, flight instructor, engineer, and educator.  He lives near San Antonio, Texas, USA. The commemorative flights are co-sponsored by The Classic Aircraft Aviation Museum, a non-profit in Texas, and many other individuals who contribute to supporting the flights through donations.

Project Amelia Earhart website: http://projectameliaearhart.org

Press Kit: http://projectameliaearhart.org/press

Press Contact: Amy Hartmel, Media Coordinator.

 

ENDS

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(360 words)

 

Photos and Images Released for Publication

 

Brian Lloyd in airplane Spirit on 21 May 2017 at 20000ft over USA Photo by Brian Lloyd

Brian Lloyd piloting the  airplane Spirit in flight on 21 May 2017 at 20,000 feet over eastern USA. Photo by Brian Lloyd via satellite

 

Brian Lloyd prior to flight of airplane Spirit 21 MAY 2017 in Spring Branch Texas USA

Brian Lloyd prior to flight of airplane Spirit 21 MAY 2017 in Texas USA. Click for higher resolution.

Brian Lloyd pauses prior to flight of airplane Spirit 21 MAY 2017 in Spring Branch Texas USA - Photo Credit: Josh Flowers CC-BY 2.0

Brian Lloyd pauses prior to flight of airplane Spirit 21 MAY 2017 in Texas USA. Click for higher resolution.

 

Brian Lloyd prepares for flight of airplane Spirit 21 MAY 2017 in Spring Branch Texas USA - Photo Credit: Josh Flowers CC-BY 2.0

Brian Lloyd prepares for flight of airplane Spirit 21 MAY 2017 in Texas USA. Click for higher resolution.

 

Brian Lloyd flies his airplane Spirit during a test flight above Texas, USA

Brian Lloyd flies his airplane Spirit during a test flight above Texas, USA. May 2017. Credit: Josh Flowers. CC-BY.

 

Brian Lloyd holds the extra 100 gallon fuel tank during installation in the Spirit airplane

Brian Lloyd holds the 100 gallon extra fuel tank during its installation into the airplane Spirit. May 2017. Credit: Brian Lloyd. CC-BY.

Recently completed upgrades to the airplane Spirit includes improved avionics shown in this photo May 2017

Recently completed upgrades to the airplane Spirit includes improved avionics shown in this photo. May 2017. Brian Lloyd. CC-BY.

Factoids

The previous New York to Paris speed record for this type of aircraft was set in 1983 in a Beechcraft Bonanza.

  • NAA/FAI (National Aeronautic Association) World Record: Speed Over a Recognized Course
    Start City: New York; Finish City: Paris
    Performance: 200.61 mph (322.85 kmh)
    Class , Subclass , Classification , Group C , C-1 , c , I (Internal Combustion)

Brian Lloyd Quotes

Pilot Humor:

“Does this extra fuel tank make my plane look fat?”

“The three most useless things in flying are the altitude above you, the runway behind you, and the fuel that’s not in the tanks.”

On Historic Aviation

“I started flying in 1968. I was 14 and my father taught me to fly. That was only 41 years after Lindbergh’s flight. The Boeing 707, 727, and Douglas DC-8 were the mainstays of commercial air service, with non-stop flights from NYC to Paris happening on a daily basis.”

“Surprisingly, airplanes themselves have not changed that much since 1968. Yes, we got the Boeing 747 a few years later and it is only now starting to be phased out for more efficient twin-engine aircraft. The cockpits look different now, with computers doing more of the work, completely eliminating the Flight Engineer from the flight crew, but even with that, the pilot from 1968 would immediately understand most of the new flight deck and could become completely comfortable after a few hours in a simulator. “

“But if we could bring Charles Lindbergh forward to today, I would bet that in 10 hours I could train him to operate Spirit and do his flight all over again. Equally, I know I could fly the Sprit of St. Louis and repeat his flight if I wanted to. The connection across a century of flight is still there. ”

“One more thought about aviation and time. 24 years spanned from the Wright’s first controlled, powered flight to Lindbergh’s flight to Paris. Only 37 more years passed before the advent of the SR71, perhaps the pinnacle of aircraft aerodynamic technology. Flight in aircraft has has truly become a mature technology.”

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